Your 7 Good Deeds for the first Week of Ramadan

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ssarah

The holy month of Ramadan is about so much more than just fasting. It is about seeking knowledge, reading the Qur’an, getting closer to God, spending time with the self, friends and family, charity and doing good. Good deeds are an instrumental part of being Muslim and Ramadan itself. Perhaps you are thinking about the “big” good deeds one performs and about how it may be impossible to do seven each week. But one good deed a day keeps dark thoughts and feelings away. Putting a smile on someone else’s face is the best remedy for feeling restless, impatient and hangry (angry because hungry). It does not matter how big the deed, so long as it is with the right intentions. Every small deed is an act of worship and kindness towards others. Their rewards raise each small good deed to become big mountains that give us strength. Every week until Eid we will therefore give you 7 good deeds for the week, for you to try to complete. Here they come!

 

1. Offer a bottle of water to someone

Take a few bottles of water with you when leaving the house. You can pass them out as you walk to the corner shop, give them to someone working on a construction site, or if you’re waiting at the traffic light in your car see if you can pass it to someone when the sun sets. The value of water increases by 10000 during Ramadan, so share it!

 

2. Exchange friendly words with your neighbor

How well do you know your neighbor? A few simple words exchanged may serve as a way to show that you care and that you appreciate your neighbor. It’s really no biggie, but can go a long way with someone’s mood.

 

3. Spending time in mosques

Spending additional time in the mosque emphasizes your dedication to being pious and getting closer to god. If you worship a different God, it’s not a problem, maybe try to go to Religious Complex once a week and rekindle the bond with your church.

 

4. Visit the sick and elderly

Volunteer with a hospital or a charity to help the sick or less fortunate directly in Qatar. Or visit a family member or family friend who’s in hospital and spend a little more time with them. Maybe you can sit with your friend’s grandma and play a board game. For you it’s an hour or two but to them it might be the most fun of the day. After all Ramadan is about spending time with your loved ones and everyone deserves love, love and love.

 

5. Help an animal

You can find displaced and rejected pets all around the country. If you spot one, feed it and give it a little water. If the little fella needs more TLC, drive it to a vet and find a shelter if you can’t provide a home. Kindness to animals is crucial to practicing good deeds in Islam.

 

6. Write a letter to your relatives

To be fair; this does not have to be a letter. You can call, skype or email a loved one who’s over the ocean. Stay connected and water your relationships. They will flourish and you will remain close to your family’s heart. My suggestion for your email with an edge; hand write it, scan it and send it as an attachment. It’s so much more personal, because in every swing of the pen comes a piece of you.

 

7. Give your colleagues a break

The last good deed is to pay extra attention to who could use a break, some help or a little assistance with a task. Offer to help carry heavy things, swap a shift for your colleague’s benefit or simply reassure them they can count on your support. Fasting is especially hard at work and school, so be as considerate as you’d want everyone to be of you. 

 

Now that you have a list of good deeds for the week, let us see how many you can complete and who practiced the most! Of course, the idea is to be humble and do each deed with true intentions without completing them as chores. Still pay special attention to what you are doing, and how you are doing it. One good deed each day from Friday to Thursday. Let us know what you think of these deeds and if you will be able to do some in the next week!

For more info about Ramadan and where to go, what to do, do visit http://www.ramadan.qa/

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